Accounts Receivable Subsidiary Ledger

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DEFINITION of 'Accounts Receivable Subsidiary Ledger'

An accounting ledger that shows the transaction and payment history separately for each customer to whom the business extends credit. The balance in each customer account is periodically reconciled with the accounts receivable balance in the general ledger, to ensure accuracy. The subsidiary ledger is also commonly referred to as the subledger or subaccount.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounts Receivable Subsidiary Ledger'

The usefulness of the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger lies in the fact that it can show, at a glance, the account status and amounts owed by a specific customer. For example, the general balance may show a total accounts receivable balance of $100,000, but it will not show which customer owes how much. This information can be gleaned from the accounts receivable subsidiary ledger.

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