Accredited Advisor In Insurance - AAI

Definition of 'Accredited Advisor In Insurance - AAI'


An advanced professional designation earned by insurance producers who complete a course of study and successfully take a series of three national examinations. AAI demonstrates a level of knowledge that is well above that of an insurance producer or agent, and confers on the holder a level of expertise that is very useful when marketing to sophisticated clients.

Investopedia explains 'Accredited Advisor In Insurance - AAI'


Like many advanced professional designations, AAI demonstrates a level of commitment and knowledge that is helpful to insurance producers in acquiring clients. The examinations are designed to test multiline knowledge, ethics and technical aspects of insurance that are products of broad industry experience.



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