Accreting Principal Swap


DEFINITION of 'Accreting Principal Swap'

A derivative where counterparties exchange financial instrument benefits, involving a growing notional principal amount. An accreting principal swap, is an interest rate or cross-currency swap where the notional principal grows as it reaches maturity. This type of swap may be used in instances where the borrower anticipates the need to draw down funds over a certain period of time but wants to fix the cost of the funds in advance.

Also called accreting swap, accumulation swap, construction loan swap, drawdown swap and step-up swap.

BREAKING DOWN 'Accreting Principal Swap'

An example of a situation where an accreting principal swap might be sought, is to fix the costs in response to a project's funding requirements. An accreting principal swap is priced by determining the cost of deferring the various trances of the principal along with the legs of the swap itself.

  1. Reverse Swap

    An exchange of cash flow streams that undoes the effects of an ...
  2. Notional Principal Amount

    In an interest rate swap, the predetermined dollar amounts on ...
  3. Interest Rate Swap

    An agreement between two parties (known as counterparties) where ...
  4. Swap

    Traditionally, the exchange of one security for another to change ...
  5. Notional Value

    The total value of a leveraged position's assets. This term is ...
  6. Credit Default Swap - CDS

    A particular type of swap designed to transfer the credit exposure ...
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Alphabet Soup Of Credit Derivative Indexes

    Find out how these instruments work and how they are used in the market.
  2. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To Swaps

    Learn how these derivatives work and how companies can benefit from them.
  3. Investing Basics

    What Does Plain Vanilla Mean?

    Plain vanilla is a term used in investing to describe the most basic types of financial instruments.
  4. Investing

    Oil: Why Not to Put Faith in Forecasts

    West Texas Intermediate oil futures have recently made pronounced movements. What do they bode for the world market?
  5. Economics

    Is the U.S. Economy Ready for Liftoff?

    The Fed continues to delay normalizing rates, citing inflation concerns and “global economic and financial developments” in explaining its rationale.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Risks of Investing in Inverse ETFs

    Discover analyses of the risks inherent to inverse exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that investors must understand before considering an investment in this type of ETF.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 4 Inverse Equities ETFs

    Explore analysis of some of the most popular inverse and leveraged-inverse ETFs that track equity indexes, and learn about the suitability of these ETFs.
  8. Investing

    2 Sectors to Explore When Rates Rise

    While the market selloff and declining inflation expectations have lowered the probability of a Fed rate rise, U.S. economic data still supports it.
  9. Investing

    Ideas for Your Bond Portfolio When Rates Rise

    It has been nearly 10 years since the Fed last raised interest rates, and though the central bank didn’t hike rates this month, they look to be coming.
  10. Investing News

    Friday Intel: PPI and The Fed

    Markets were relatively quiet overnight with U.S. stock market futures pointing to a modestly lower open, down around 0.35%.
  1. What is a "gypsy swap"?

    A gypsy swap is a unique method by which a company may raise capital without issuing debt or holding a secondary offering. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  2. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  3. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  4. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  5. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
  6. Cost Of Funds

    The interest rate paid by financial institutions for the funds that they deploy in their business. The cost of funds is one ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!