Accrue

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DEFINITION of 'Accrue'

The ability for something to accumulate over time. In finance, "accrue" is most commonly used when referring to interest, income and expenses of an individual or business. Interest in your savings account accrues so that over time the total amount in your account grows.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accrue'

In practice, the word "accrue" is often synonymous with the concept of accrual accounting, which has become the standard accounting practice for most companies. This form of accounting measures the performance and position of a company by recognizing economic events regardless of when cash transactions occur, which gives a better picture of the company's financial health.

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