Accrued Income

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DEFINITION of 'Accrued Income'

Income that is earned in a fund or by company by providing a service or selling a product, but has yet to be received. Mutual funds or other pooled assets that accumulate income over a period of time but only pay it out to shareholders once a year are, by definition, accruing their income. Individual companies can also accrue income without actually receiving it, which is the basis of the accrual accounting system.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accrued Income'

For example, assume that a company is expected to complete services for another company once per month for six consecutive months, but that under the terms of the contract, it will not receive monetary payment for these services until the end of the six-month period. The company performing the services can accrue a percentage of the income earned after each month, even though physical payment will not take place until after the six-month period.

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