Accrued Interest

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DEFINITION of 'Accrued Interest'

1. A term used to describe an accrual accounting method when interest that is either payable or receivable has been recognized, but not yet paid or received. Accrued interest occurs as a result of the difference in timing of cash flows and the measurement of these cash flows.

2. The interest that has accumulated on a bond since the last interest payment up to, but not including, the settlement date.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accrued Interest'

1. For example, accrued interest receivable occurs when interest on an outstanding receivable has been earned by the company, but has not yet been received. A loan to a customer for goods sold would result in interest being charged on the loan. If the loan is extended on October 1 and the lending company's year ends on December 31, there will be two months of accrued interest receivable recorded as interest revenue in the company's financial statements for the year.

2. Accrued interest is added to the contract price of a bond transaction. Accrued interest is that which has been earned since the last coupon payment. Because the bond hasn't expired or the next payment is not yet due, the owner of the bond hasn't officially received the money. If he or she sells the bond, accrued interest is added to the sale price.

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