DEFINITION of 'Accumulation Option '

A policy feature of permanent life insurance that allows policyholders to leave any dividends received with the insurer, where the dividends can earn interest. Accumulation options are the variety of options holders of participating life insurance policies can make with the dividends they receive. Some types of insurance pay dividends to their policyholders each year when the insurance company performs better than estimated.


Also called an "accumulation option," "accumulation at interest option" or "dividends on accumulation".

BREAKING DOWN 'Accumulation Option '

Common options available to participating permanent life insurance policyholders are to use their dividends to purchase more insurance, or to pay a portion of their existing premiums. They can also elect to receive their dividends immediately as cash, or to leave them on deposit with the insurance company to earn interest.

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