Acquirer

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DEFINITION of 'Acquirer'

1. The firm which is purchasing a company in an acquisition. The acquirer is also known as a bidder.

2. A financial institution or merchant bank (a merchant acquirer) which is contacted to authorize a credit card or debit purchase. The acquirer will either approve or decline the debit or credit card purchase amount. If approved the acquirer will then settle the transaction by placing the funds into the seller's account.

BREAKING DOWN 'Acquirer'

1. Usually the acquirer's stock price will see a short term drop when acquiring a company. The drop is due to the uncertainty of the transaction, also the acquirer will usually pay a premium for the purchase.

2. Every time you use your credit or debit card you are using the services of an acquirer. An Acquirer will charge a monthly and/or a per transaction fee to the stores or merchants to facilitate transactions. Acquirers need to be licensed with credit card companies, such as Visa or MasterCard.

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