Acquisition Cost

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Acquisition Cost'

1. The cost that a company recognizes on its books for property or equipment after adjusting for discounts, incentives, closing costs and other necessary expenditures, but before sales taxes.

2. The cost of a business to acquire a new customer. The company recognizes costs, including marketing and incentives, to introduce new customers to the company's products and services. The customer acquisition cost is calculated by dividing total acquisition costs by total new customers over a set period of time.

Also known as "cost of acquisition."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Acquisition Cost'

1. Acquisition costs recognize more realistic costs on a company's financial statements. The acquisition cost of property and equipment recognizes any discounts or additional costs that the company will experience.

2. Customer acquisition costs are also important for companies to measure, as it aids in planning future capital allocations to things like marketing budgets and sales discounts. The company should also look at customer loyalty and whether the company will be able to retain customers easily.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Amalgamation

    The combination of one or more companies into a new entity. An ...
  2. Repurposing

    The use of something for a purpose other than its original intended ...
  3. Acquisition Financing

    The capital that is obtained for the purpose of buying another ...
  4. Loss Leader Strategy

    A business strategy in which a business offers a product or service ...
  5. Property, Plant And Equipment - ...

    A company asset that is vital to business operations but cannot ...
  6. Marketing

    The activities of a company associated with buying and selling ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How rapidly can expanding sales reduce a firm's earnings?

    In order to operate and make money, a company must spend money. Revenue - the dollar amount of sales - can be seen on a company's ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is property, plant and equipment, and what does it mean?

    Property, plant and equipment (PP&E) is a term that describes an account on the balance sheet. The PP&E account ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why are the terms 'merger' and 'acquisition' always used together if they describe ...

    The terms "merger" and "acquisition" are used together because they both describe processes by which two companies become ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What level of mergers and acquisitions is common in the chemical sector?

    The level of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the chemicals sector has surged to an all-time high since the turn of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can a company buy back shares to fend off a hostile takeover?

    There are several reasons why a company may choose to repurchase some or all of the outstanding shares of its stock. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the benefits of using ceteris paribus assumptions in economics?

    Most, though not all, economists rely on ceteris paribus conditions to build and test economic models. The reason they do ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Great Expectations: Forecasting Sales Growth

    Predicting sales growth can be something of a black art, unless you ask the right questions.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Measuring Company Efficiency

    Three useful indicators for measuring a retail company's efficiency are its inventory turnaround times, its receivables and its collection period.
  3. Entrepreneurship

    Tips For Boosting Your Business

    Find out how butter up new clients, build up old files and better your bottom line.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  5. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  6. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI)

    The Herfindhal-Hirschman Index, (HHI) is a measure of market concentration and competition among market participants.
  8. Investing

    How To Implement A Smart Beta Investing Strategy

    Smart beta investing is the notion of re-writing investment rules to improve investment outcomes by targeting exposures to intuitive ideas or factors.
  9. Investing

    Market Crisis: Does Diversification Still Work?

    If you still aren’t sold on the benefits of international diversification, you may object that: Diversification didn’t work during the last market crisis.
  10. Economics

    Explaining the Value Chain

    A model of how businesses receive raw materials as input, add value to the raw materials, and sell finished products to customers.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  2. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  5. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  6. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
Trading Center