Acting In Concert

DEFINITION of 'Acting In Concert'

A slang term for when parties undertake identical investment actions to achieve the same goal. Acting in concert requires the cooperation of people or corporations to make the same transactions based on a previous arrangement.

BREAKING DOWN 'Acting In Concert'

The issue of acting in concert is often examined in the world of acquisitions. Investors are usually required to declare any takeover intentions or place a tender offer after acquiring a specific percentage of shares in a company. However, some may try to spread the ownership percentage among friendly parties in an attempt to avoid declaring or bidding. Regulators have determined that if people are acting in concert and the sum of ownership exceeds the specified percentage, the group must declare its intentions.

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