Actuarial Consultant

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Actuarial Consultant'

A professional who advises clients on which methods, processes, policies, plans, etc. they should consider when making financial, insurance- or pension-related decisions. Actuarial consultants calculate and analyze statistics, make forecasts, provide the most accurate information to clients and help them realize what their best options are.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Actuarial Consultant'

Actuarial consultants are informed in many disciplines, including statistics, economics, law, probability, finance and risk assessment. They use this extensive training to ensure the advice they give is in the best interest of the client.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Revolving Door

    The movement of high-level employees from public sector jobs ...
  2. Government Actuary

    An employee of the U.K. government who works for the Government's ...
  3. Economics

    A social science that studies how individuals, governments, firms ...
  4. Actuary

    A professional statistician working for an insurance company. ...
  5. Insurance

    A contract (policy) in which an individual or entity receives ...
  6. Risk

    The chance that an investment's actual return will be different ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a "linear" exposure in Value at Risk (VaR) calculation?

    A linear exposure in the value-at-risk, or VaR, calculation is represented by positions in stocks, bonds, commodities or ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the criteria for a simple random sample?

    Simple random sampling is the most basic form of sampling and can be a component of more precise, more complex sampling methods. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why would a company issue a rights offering?

    Companies most commonly issue a rights offering to raise additional capital. A company may need extra capital to meet its ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between share purchase rights and options?

    There is a big difference between share purchase rights and options. With share purchase rights, the holder may or may not ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some examples of ways that sensitivity analysis can be used?

    Sensitivity analysis is an analysis method that is used to identify how much variations in the input values for a given variable ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between an option-adjusted spread and a Z-spread in reference ...

    Unlike the Z-spread calculation, the option-adjusted spread takes into account how the embedded option in a bond can change ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    Insure Your Future With A Career As An Actuary

    If you've got excellent math skills, they can add up to a lucrative career as an actuary.
  2. Budgeting

    Find The Right Financial Advisor

    Learn how to weed out those who are just out to make a quick buck.
  3. Retirement

    The Gatekeepers: Consultants Hold The Key

    Institutional investment consultants help match up asset managers with large institutions.
  4. Budgeting

    Consulting - Everybody's Doing It, Should You?

    Fancy yourself a problem solver? Management consulting might be right for you.
  5. Investing

    The Strong Dollar’s (Real) Toll On Tech Stocks

    A large portion of U.S. technology companies’ sales occur overseas, given the strong international business and consumer demand from many U.S. tech firms.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    How to Calculate a Coverage Ratio

    In broad terms, the higher the coverage ratio, the better the ability of the enterprise to fulfill its obligations to its lenders.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI)

    The Herfindhal-Hirschman Index, (HHI) is a measure of market concentration and competition among market participants.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Net Interest Margin

    Net interest margin is a metric used to measure the effectiveness of a company’s investment decisions, particularly financial institutions.
  9. Investing

    What More Volatility Means For Momentum Stocks

    One byproduct of the recent tick higher in bond yields: a meaningful rise in volatility for both stocks and bonds.
  10. Options & Futures

    How & Why Interest Rates Affect Options

    The Fed is expected to change interest rates soon. We explain how a change in interest rates impacts option valuations.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  2. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  3. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  4. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
  5. Rule Of 70

    A way to estimate the number of years it takes for a certain variable to double. The rule of 70 states that in order to estimate ...
  6. Risk Premium

    The return in excess of the risk-free rate of return that an investment is expected to yield. An asset's risk premium is ...
Trading Center