Actuarial Consultant

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DEFINITION of 'Actuarial Consultant'

A professional who advises clients on which methods, processes, policies, plans, etc. they should consider when making financial, insurance- or pension-related decisions. Actuarial consultants calculate and analyze statistics, make forecasts, provide the most accurate information to clients and help them realize what their best options are.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Actuarial Consultant'

Actuarial consultants are informed in many disciplines, including statistics, economics, law, probability, finance and risk assessment. They use this extensive training to ensure the advice they give is in the best interest of the client.

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