Ad-Noter

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DEFINITION of 'Ad-Noter'

A person who has noticed an advertisement in a publication. An ad-noter is someone who may only have noted the advertisement or glanced at it without any recall of the product or service it promotes, as opposed to people who have had a closer look at the ad or have read part of it. The term was introduced by noted advertising researcher Daniel Starch in the 1920s and is used in Starch Tests that measure the effectiveness of elements of an advertisement such as its size and layout.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Ad-Noter'

Daniel Starch was a pioneer in measuring the recognition of printed advertisements. The technique was based on his view that print advertisements were ineffective unless they were noted by readers. Based on interviews with readers, researchers group them into various categories based on their degree of recall of a particular advertisement. The percentage of ad-noters who have noticed an ad, out of all readers who have been exposed to it, gives rise to a measure of advertising effectiveness called the noted score.

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