Adaptive Selling

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DEFINITION of 'Adaptive Selling'

A selling strategy in which the way a product or service is presented varies according to the type of consumer viewing it. Adaptive selling takes into account the situation in which the product or service is presented, the demographics of the consumer and feedback that has been received about the product or service.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Adaptive Selling'

Adaptive selling can be an expensive strategy to use in retail, and thus is typically found in more upscale stores. The higher level of personalization requires better-trained personnel who are more costly. Adaptive selling has been effectively used in e-commerce, as computer algorithms are quickly able to see the products that a visitor views or ultimately purchases and can adapt to offer products the customer might also be interested in.

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