Add-On

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DEFINITION of 'Add-On '

Additional shares put on the market by a company that has already gone public. Reasons why a company might use add-on financing include raising cash to fund existing operations, expanding operations or paying for a new project. While an add-on is useful for raising money, it can cause the company's share price to decline, and current shareholders to be diluted.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Add-On '

From the existing shareholders' perspective, the issuance of add-on stock is a bad thing because it usually reduces the value of the stock they own. More shares mean that existing shareholders will see their percentage of ownership in the company decrease. They may also see the stock's earnings per share decline. However, if the add-on is able to increase earnings and shareholder value in the long-term, it will generally be viewed as a positive decision.

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