Additional Living Expense Insurance

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DEFINITION of 'Additional Living Expense Insurance'

Coverage under a homeowner's, condominium owner's or renter's insurance policy that covers the additional costs of living that are incurred by the policy holder should the policy holder be temporarily displaced from their place of residence. Such coverage is usually at about 10% to 20% of the insurance that covers the dwelling.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Additional Living Expense Insurance'

Additional living expense insurance can cover things like the increase in a monthly food bill due to having to eat-out at restaurants or even the loss of income that might be incurred if the insured person were renting out part of their space to a tenant. Essentially the insurance is intended to cover the insured person for the extra expenses he or she may incur due to being temporarily displaced from their home, such as in the case of a fire or flood.

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