Address Coding Guide - ACG

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DEFINITION of 'Address Coding Guide - ACG'

A comprehensive directory of street names and address ranges. The Address Coding Guide (ACG) was initially created by the U.S. Census Bureau to enable automated assignment of addresses on a mailing list. This mailing list is used to gather information on the demographics of the U.S. population. Certain entities such as cities and municipalities or large mailing firms may maintain their own address coding guides.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Address Coding Guide - ACG'

Data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau is analyzed by many economists, traders and policymakers who govern the country and make economic decisions. Firms that maintain their own address coding guides do so for more efficient sorting and management of mailing lists. Cities and municipalities maintain address coding guides primarily to match external information sources with their internal revenue files, so as to enable automated revenue verification.

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