DEFINITION of 'Adjudication'

A legal ruling or judgment. Adjudication can also refer to the legal process of hearing and settling a case. It usually refers to the final judgment or pronouncement in a case that will determine the course of action taken in reference to the issue presented.

BREAKING DOWN 'Adjudication'

Adjudication can also refer to a decree in the bankruptcy process between the defendant and the creditors. In the healthcare industry, adjudication is used to determine the carrier's liability for claims submitted by the insured. Adjudications can be handed down in disputes between private parties and public officials or organizations.

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