Adjunct Account


DEFINITION of 'Adjunct Account'

An account in financial reporting that increases the book value of a liability account. An adjunct account is a valuation account from which credit balances are added to another account. For example, if a company issues bonds, the unamortized premium on bonds payable account (sometimes called bond premium) is an adjunct account because its credit balance is added to the bonds payable account.

BREAKING DOWN 'Adjunct Account'

Since a liability account's normal balance is a credit balance, the bond premium account is an adjunct account (its credit balances are added to a separate account). This is in contrast to a contra account, as a discount on bonds payable account would result in a debit to a liability account.

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