Adjustment Bureau


DEFINITION of 'Adjustment Bureau'

An organization that focuses on helping businesses collect outstanding debts from delinquent debtors. Adjustment Bureaus are also known as Collection Agencies. Most Adjustment Bureaus earn a percentage of the outstanding debt upon successful collection. An Adjustment Bureau is not a loan agency or a debt consolidation service, they serve their business clients as opposed to the debtors.

BREAKING DOWN 'Adjustment Bureau'

While most Adjustment Bureaus are privately owned, they operate under collection laws established by the federal government. These laws are in place to prevent abusive practices. Adjustment Bureaus must have expertise in collection and bankruptcy laws to help guide customers through the process. In addition, many Adjustment Bureaus choose to specialize in a specific type of collections. For example, medical claims or retail claims as opposed to being a collections generalist. Fees charged are usually on a sliding scale. For example, the larger the outstanding debt, the smaller the percentage earned. The amount earned on a $2000.00 balance might be 10%, but the amount earned on a $10,000.00 balance would be 8%.

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