Adjustment Bond

DEFINITION of 'Adjustment Bond'

Issued by a corporation during a restructuring phase, an adjustment bond is given to the bondholders of an outstanding bond issue prior to the restructuring. The debt obligation is consolidated and transferred from the outstanding bond issue to the adjustment bond. This is effectively a recapitalization of the company's outstanding debt obligations, which is accomplished by adjusting the terms (such as interest rates and lengths to maturity) to increase the likelihood that the company will be able to meet its obligations.

BREAKING DOWN 'Adjustment Bond'

If a company is near bankruptcy and requires protection from creditors (Chapter 11), it is likely unable to make payments on its debt obligations. If this is the case, the company will be liquidated and the value will be spread among its creditors. However, creditors will generally only receive a fraction of their original loans to the company. This is why creditors and the company will work together to recapitalize debt obligations so that the company is able to meet its obligations and continue operations, thus increasing the value that creditors will receive.

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