Administrative Accounting

DEFINITION of 'Administrative Accounting'

The financial reporting of factors that influence decision making, operational control and managerial planning. Administrative accounting focuses on management planning and control to accomplish the company's administrative goals.

BREAKING DOWN 'Administrative Accounting'

Administrative accounting involves a formal methodology for gathering, reporting and evaluating financial data that deals with management planning and control. The reports can help administrators and managers evaluate the day-to-day activities of the operation.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital be used for?

    Working capital is used to cover all of a company's short-term expenses, including inventory, payments on short-term debt ... Read Full Answer >>
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