Administrative Accounting

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DEFINITION of 'Administrative Accounting'

The financial reporting of factors that influence decision making, operational control and managerial planning. Administrative accounting focuses on management planning and control to accomplish the company's administrative goals.

BREAKING DOWN 'Administrative Accounting'

Administrative accounting involves a formal methodology for gathering, reporting and evaluating financial data that deals with management planning and control. The reports can help administrators and managers evaluate the day-to-day activities of the operation.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are dividends considered an expense?

    Cash or stock dividends distributed to shareholders are not considered an expense on a company's income statement. Stock ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do dividends go on the balance sheet?

    The only account recorded on the balance sheet, when dividends are declared and before they are paid out to a company's shareholders, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>

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