Administrative Expenses

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DEFINITION of 'Administrative Expenses'

The expenses that an organization incurs not directly tied to a specific function such as manufacturing/production or sales. These expenses are related to the organization as a whole as opposed to an individual department; also referred to as "administrative cost."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Administrative Expenses'

Salaries of senior executives and costs of general services such as accounting are examples of administrative expenses.

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