Administrative Law

DEFINITION of 'Administrative Law'

The body of law that governs the administration and regulation of government agencies (both federal and state). Created by Congress (or the state legislature) it encompasses the procedures under which these agencies operate as well as external constraints upon them. Administrative law is considered a branch of public law and is often referred to as regulatory law.

BREAKING DOWN 'Administrative Law'

Over the years, government agencies have steadily grown both in number and importance in the United States. They affect a wide variety of social issues, such as telecommunications, the financial market and racial discrimination. Examples of these agencies include the Department of Labor (DOL), the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC).

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