DEFINITION of 'Administrator'

1. A person empowered by a court to act for another person who is deemed incapable of acting for himself/herself.

2. Under the Uniform Securities Act, an entity that enforces the rules and regulations, including registration requirements and post-registration requirements, of investment advisory professionals.

BREAKING DOWN 'Administrator'

1. For example, an Administrator is appointed to take charge of an estate if an individual has died without leaving a will.

2. Commonly referred to as the "State Administrator".

  1. Real Estate

    Land plus anything on it, including buildings and natural resources.
  2. Third-Party Claims Administrator

    This type of administrator processes claims for a third-party ...
  3. Trust

    A fiduciary relationship in which one party, known as a trustor, ...
  4. Investment Advisor

    As defined by the Investment Advisors Act of 1940, any person ...
  5. Blue Sky Laws

    State regulations designed to protect investors against securities ...
  6. Trustee

    A person or firm that holds or administers property or assets ...
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