Admiralty Proceeding

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DEFINITION of 'Admiralty Proceeding'

Any matter that comes before an admiralty court that involves shipping or a shipping vessel. Admiralty law (also known as maritime law) governs all private legal matters involving events happening in the seas or in bodies of water that have multiple national jurisdictions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Admiralty Proceeding'

In the United States, admiralty proceedings are handled by the U.S. federal district courts, but there may be state court issues involved with admiralty matters occurring within U.S. boundaries. In other countries, such as the United Kingdom and Singapore, admiralty courts are a separate venue and jurisdiction from other courts. Much of admiralty law is grounded in English statutes and other conventions that have evolved over hundreds of years since the advent of shipping commerce. As an example, passengers of the Titanic bringing civil claims against the ship were heard in an admiralty proceeding.

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