Advisor Fee

DEFINITION of 'Advisor Fee'

The fee that is paid to a financial advisor for recommending a load mutual fund based on the needs and time-frame of an investor. Fees differ according to the class of mutual fund shares, and are paid to the advisor for recommending a fund that suits an investor's time and goals. Depending on the share class, advisor's can either receive a one-time fee up-front or an annual fee as long as the investor holds the asset.

BREAKING DOWN 'Advisor Fee'

The fee that an investor pays on A shares is upfront, starting at around 4-5% and decreases as more is invested. An investor with a large amount to invest over the long-term would be best suited with A shares. An investor with the same time-frame, but less to invest might do better in B shares. C shares are best for those investing for the short-term. Note that 12b-1 fees, the fees paid to a mutual fund's management, are higher for B and C shares, and lower for A shares. When choosing a class of shares, an investor should consider first how long they can invest. The advisor will get paid either way for directing you into the investment.

Also, investors who already have a fund picked out should pick a no-load fund, sidestepping the extra fees. The load goes to pay for the advice of the advisor. If that advice is not needed, don't pay the price for it.

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