Advisory Management


DEFINITION of 'Advisory Management'

A group within a bank or brokerage that provides professional, personalized investment guidance. Advisory management services allow private individuals to consult with investment professionals before making changes to their portfolios. Advisory management professionals have expertise in one or more investment areas and provide guidance that is tailored to an individual's specific situation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Advisory Management'

Investment advisors who work for advisory management groups will assess a client's time horizon, performance objectives and risk tolerance to determine which asset classes will be the most suitable investments. They will also provide guidance in the areas of asset allocation and portfolio rebalancing, and they will monitor investment performance and execute orders. Advisory management services allow individuals to retain full control over their portfolios and make their own investment decisions; the investment advisor's role is solely to offer an informed opinion.

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