After The Bell

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DEFINITION of 'After The Bell'

A phrase used to describe news, earnings reports and other activities that are released after the stock market has closed for the day. Announcements after the bell are integrated into stock prices at the open of the next trading session, as investors are not able to place orders when the market is closed. Positive information about a particular security, released after the bell, may result in a surge in early morning trading activity, while negative news may result in a security opening lower.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'After The Bell'

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) traditionally rings a bell at the beginning of the day's trading session and closes trading by ringing the "Closing Bell." Though activity on the market floor has slowed with the advent of electronic trading, dignitaries and celebrities are often given the honor of ringing the bell to mark the open and closing of floor activity.

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