Aggregate Supply

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DEFINITION of 'Aggregate Supply'

The total supply of goods and services produced within an economy at a given overall price level in a given time period. It is represented by the aggregate-supply curve, which describes the relationship between price levels and the quantity of output that firms are willing to provide. Normally, there is a positive relationship between aggregate supply and the price level. Rising prices are usually signals for businesses to expand production to meet a higher level of aggregate demand.

Also known as "total output".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Aggregate Supply'

A shift in aggregate supply can be attributed to a number of variables. These include changes in the size and quality of labor, technological innovations, increase in wages, increase in production costs, changes in producer taxes and subsidies, and changes in inflation. In the short run, aggregate supply responds to higher demand (and prices) by bringing more inputs into the production process and increasing utilization of current inputs. In the long run, however, aggregate supply is not affected by the price level and is driven only by improvements in productivity and efficiency.

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