Alaska Permanent Fund

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DEFINITION of 'Alaska Permanent Fund'

A permanent fund for the U.S. state of Alaska. The Alaska Permanent Fund originates from surplus revenues gained from the development of Alaska's oil and gas reserves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Alaska Permanent Fund'

The Alaska Permanent Fund was established in 1976 by an amendment to the Alaska state constitution. The fund pays an annual dividend to all Alaska residents who meet eligibility requirements. The fund invests in a wide array of asset classes, including domestic stocks, U.S. bonds, global stocks, real estate and private equity.

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