Alexander M. Cutler

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DEFINITION of 'Alexander M. Cutler'

The CEO and chairman of power-management company Eaton Corporation. The company produces electrical components and systems; hydraulics components, systems and services; aerospace fuel, hydraulics and pneumatic systems; and vehicle drivetrain and powertrain systems. Cutler helped the company to diversify beyond its initial business, the production of automotive parts, and acquire Westinghouse and numerous other companies while selling off Eaton's less successful divisions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Alexander M. Cutler'

Born in Milwaukee in 1951, Cutler received his undergraduate degree from Yale in 1973, and upon earning his MBA from Dartmouth in 1975, he began working as a financial analyst for Cutler-Hammer (the name was coincidental). Eaton acquired Cutler-Hammer in 1979, and over the years Cutler worked his way up through the company, becoming its president and COO in 1995 and its CEO and chairman in August 2000.



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