Alimony Trust


DEFINITION of 'Alimony Trust'

A legal arrangement where property is transferred to a former spouse as a source of support following a divorce or separation. The payor spouse transfers investments and other assets that generate income into an alimony trust for the recipient spouse or beneficiary. The payor spouse cannot claim an alimony deduction on the income from an alimony trust, while the recipient spouse is taxed on the income but not the principal.

BREAKING DOWN 'Alimony Trust'

Alimony trusts are particularly useful in situations where a greater degree of protection is desired, either from the payor spouse or recipient spouse's point of view. For example, the payor spouse may be concerned about the recipient spouse's lack of financial experience in managing a large divorce settlement. Similarly, the recipient spouse may be concerned about the risk of the payor spouse's business becoming insolvent, which may have a detrimental impact on his or her ability to make continuing support payments.

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