All-Purpose Financial Statement

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DEFINITION of 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

A record of financial activity that is suitable for a variety of users to properly assess the financial health of a company. An all-purpose financial statement is a type of financial statement that is intended for review by diverse groups, such as potential investors, creditors, employees, shareholders and suppliers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

All-purpose financial statements include the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement and could include the statement of retained earnings. A public company produces all-purpose financial statements on a quarterly and annual basis.

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