All-Purpose Financial Statement


DEFINITION of 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

A record of financial activity that is suitable for a variety of users to properly assess the financial health of a company. An all-purpose financial statement is a type of financial statement that is intended for review by diverse groups, such as potential investors, creditors, employees, shareholders and suppliers.

BREAKING DOWN 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

All-purpose financial statements include the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement and could include the statement of retained earnings. A public company produces all-purpose financial statements on a quarterly and annual basis.

  1. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  2. Financial Statements

    Records that outline the financial activities of a business, ...
  3. Current Liabilities

    A company's debts or obligations that are due within one year. ...
  4. Accounts Receivable - AR

    Money owed by customers (individuals or corporations) to another ...
  5. Accounts Payable - AP

    An accounting entry that represents an entity's obligation to ...
  6. Accountant

    A professional who performs accounting functions such as audits ...
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  1. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital be used for?

    Working capital is used to cover all of a company's short-term expenses, including inventory, payments on short-term debt ... Read Full Answer >>

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