All-Purpose Financial Statement


DEFINITION of 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

A record of financial activity that is suitable for a variety of users to properly assess the financial health of a company. An all-purpose financial statement is a type of financial statement that is intended for review by diverse groups, such as potential investors, creditors, employees, shareholders and suppliers.

BREAKING DOWN 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

All-purpose financial statements include the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement and could include the statement of retained earnings. A public company produces all-purpose financial statements on a quarterly and annual basis.

  1. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  2. Financial Statements

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  3. Current Liabilities

    A company's debts or obligations that are due within one year. ...
  4. Accounts Receivable - AR

    Money owed by customers (individuals or corporations) to another ...
  5. Accounts Payable - AP

    An accounting entry that represents an entity's obligation to ...
  6. Encumbrance

    A claim against a property by a party that is not the owner. ...
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  1. How can companies use the cash flow statement to mislead investors?

    Cash flow is a means for most investors to examine the actual economics of a business they might invest in, especially from ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be too high?

    A company's working capital ratio can be too high in the sense that an excessively high ratio is generally considered an ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include inventory?

    A company's working capital includes inventory, and increases in inventory make working capital increase. Working capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Are dividends considered an asset?

    Whether dividends paid on stock are considered an asset depends on which role you play in the investment: the issuing company ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

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