All-Purpose Financial Statement


DEFINITION of 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

A record of financial activity that is suitable for a variety of users to properly assess the financial health of a company. An all-purpose financial statement is a type of financial statement that is intended for review by diverse groups, such as potential investors, creditors, employees, shareholders and suppliers.

BREAKING DOWN 'All-Purpose Financial Statement'

All-purpose financial statements include the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement and could include the statement of retained earnings. A public company produces all-purpose financial statements on a quarterly and annual basis.

  1. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  2. Financial Statements

    Records that outline the financial activities of a business, ...
  3. Current Liabilities

    A company's debts or obligations that are due within one year. ...
  4. Accounts Receivable - AR

    Money owed by customers (individuals or corporations) to another ...
  5. Accounts Payable - AP

    An accounting entry that represents an entity's obligation to ...
  6. Encumbrance

    A claim against a property by a party that is not the owner. ...
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  1. Does working capital include prepaid expenses?

    The calculation for working capital includes any prepaid expenses that are due within one year, since such prepaid expenses ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I read and analyze an income statement?

    The income statement, also known as the profit and loss (P&L) statement, is the financial statement that depicts the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include short-term debt?

    Short-term debt is considered part of a company's current liabilities and is included in the calculation of working capital. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Cash flow is a means for most investors to examine the actual economics of a business they might invest in, especially from ... Read Full Answer >>

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