All Risks

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DEFINITION of 'All Risks'

A type of insurance coverage that can exclude only risks that have been specifically outlined in the contract. "All risks" means that any risk that the contract does not specifically omit is automatically covered. For example, if an all-risks homeowner's policy does not expressly exclude flood coverage, then the house will be covered in the event of flood damage.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'All Risks'

This type of policy is found only in the property-casualty market. All-risks insurance is obviously the most comprehensive type of coverage available. It is therefore priced proportionately higher than other types of policies, and the cost of this type of insurance should be measured against the probability of a claim.

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