Allied Member

DEFINITION of 'Allied Member'

A person who is not a member of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) but is an officer or voting shareholder of a firm with a membership. Allied members can complete transactions on the NYSE and are granted access to the trading floor.

BREAKING DOWN 'Allied Member'

People who want to be recognized as allied members must meet the rules outlined in the NYSE's Rules of the Exchange. In addition to fulfilling these requirements, the person must complete a written examination.

In order to be eligible to write the exam, shareholders must own at least a 5% stake in the member firm. Other eligible people include the company's directors or other controlling partners, and anyone the firm deems a principal executive.

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