Allocated Funding Instrument

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DEFINITION of 'Allocated Funding Instrument'

A specific type of insurance or annuity contract that pension plans use to purchase retirement benefits incrementally. The allocated funding instrument is funded with employer contributions that are paid into the plan. The benefits that are purchased by the funding instrument are guaranteed to employees at retirement.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Allocated Funding Instrument'

Pension plans that do not use allocated funding instruments use unallocated instruments instead. In these plans, there are no employer contributions available to purchase benefits before retirement. This means that no benefits are paid for at the time that the premium payments are actually made.

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