Allonge

DEFINITION of 'Allonge'

A sheet of paper attached to a bill of exchange for the purpose of documenting endorsements. The need for an allonge arises as a result of a lack of space on the bill itself.

BREAKING DOWN 'Allonge'

Because a bill of exchange is transferable through endorsement, it may be exchanged among so many parties that these parties don't all fit on the bill. In this case, a separate piece of paper - the allonge - is attached to the bill, acting as a legal extension of the document.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Blank Endorsement

    A signature by the creator of an instrument, such as a check, ...
  2. Endorsement

    1. A legal term that refers to the signing of a document which ...
  3. At Sight

    A payment due on demand. An at sight payment will require the ...
  4. Bill Of Exchange

    A non-interest-bearing written order used primarily in international ...
  5. Mezzanine Debt

    When a hybrid debt issue is subordinated to another debt issue ...
  6. Social Impact Bond - SIB

    A contract with the public sector or governing authority, whereby ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  2. Personal Finance

    How To Pick The Right Lawyer

    Find out what factors to consider before hiring an attorney.
  3. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Covered Calls

    Learn how this simple options contract can work for you, even when your stock isn't.
  4. Options & Futures

    Fueling Futures In The Energy Market

    The energy market influences every aspect of our lives, and these four options are its driving force.
  5. Options & Futures

    Profit On Your Home's Price - Even If It's Falling

    These investment vehicles can protect you - and even help you profit - when the real estate market falls.
  6. Retirement

    Be Your Own Boss By Freelancing

    Learn the pros and cons before you bid adieu to sales meetings and power suits forever.
  7. Savings

    The Difference Between Compounding Interest and Simple Interest

    Interest is the cost a borrower pays to use someone else’s money. Interest can be either simple or compounded.
  8. Investing News

    AQR Capital Management: Investment Manager Highlight

    Discover the investment strategies and secrets of hedge fund powerhouse AQR Capital Management LLC in the alternative investment space.
  9. Investing News

    Performance Review - U.S. Fixed Income in 2015

    Review the performance of the U.S. fixed-income securities in 2015, from the relatively strong U.S. municipal bond market to the calamitous high-yield space.
  10. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Do Long-Term Bonds Have A Greater Interest Rate Risk Than Short-Term Bonds?

    The answer is yes, and there are two main reasons why.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Besides a savings account, where is the safest place to keep my money?

    Savings accounts are safe because investors' deposits are guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are the maximum Social Security disability benefits?

    Find out the maximum Social Security disability benefits for qualifying individuals and couples in 2015, including who is ... Read Answer >>
  3. How do I calculate the future value of an annuity?

    Find out how to calculate the future value of an ordinary annuity or an annuity due, including how the power of compounding ... Read Answer >>
  4. Have hedge funds eroded market opportunities?

    Learn why there is still plenty of opportunity for investors even though hedge funds have grown substantially. Read about ... Read Answer >>
  5. Are high yield bonds a good investment?

    Invest in high-yield bonds through mutual funds, exchange-traded funds or closed-end funds, leaving the job of finding a ... Read Answer >>
  6. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    Discover the relationship between a bond’s current yield and risk, and how investors can use it to benefit their overall ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Keynesian Economics

    An economic theory of total spending in the economy and its effects on output and inflation. Keynesian economics was developed ...
  2. Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications ...

    A member-owned cooperative that provides safe and secure financial transactions for its members. Established in 1973, the ...
  3. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles - GAAP

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures that companies use to compile their financial statements. ...
  4. DuPont Analysis

    A method of performance measurement that was started by the DuPont Corporation in the 1920s. With this method, assets are ...
  5. Call Option

    An agreement that gives an investor the right (but not the obligation) to buy a stock, bond, commodity, or other instrument ...
  6. Economies Of Scale

    Economies of scale is the cost advantage that arises with increased output of a product. Economies of scale arise because ...
Trading Center