Allonge

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DEFINITION of 'Allonge'

A sheet of paper attached to a bill of exchange for the purpose of documenting endorsements. The need for an allonge arises as a result of a lack of space on the bill itself.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Allonge'

Because a bill of exchange is transferable through endorsement, it may be exchanged among so many parties that these parties don't all fit on the bill. In this case, a separate piece of paper - the allonge - is attached to the bill, acting as a legal extension of the document.

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