Alternate Transferee

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DEFINITION of 'Alternate Transferee'

An individual or group that is allowed to accept the transfer of an asset or security in the case that a transferee elects to not accept or is not permitted to accept the transfer. An alternate transferee is often specifically outlined in a contract agreement, though in some cases the alternate transferee may be designated by another party. An alternate transferee is chosen based on the ability to continue the terms outlined in an agreement.




INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Alternate Transferee'

For example, some company's require a board of directors to approve transfers between two different parties if the shares being transferred pass a certain threshold, such as 10% of outstanding shares. If the board of directors rejects the transfer, they may be required to designate an alternate transferee that is allowed to purchase the shares at market price.

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