Alternative Investment Market - AIM

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DEFINITION of 'Alternative Investment Market - AIM'

A sub-market of the London Stock Exchange that permits smaller companies to participate with greater regulatory flexibility than applies to the main market, including no set requirements for capitalization or the number of shares issued. The Alternative Investment Market is the London Stock Exchange's global market for smaller and growing companies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Alternative Investment Market - AIM'

As of 2010, more than 3,000 international companies have joined the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) since its launch in 1995. AIM seeks to assist smaller and growing companies in raising growth capital. Early stage businesses, venture capital-backed companies and more established businesses may join AIM to help raise the capital necessary for expansion. The FTSE Group maintains three indexes for tracking the AIM: the FTSE AIM UK 50 Index, the FTSE AIM 100 Index and the FTSE AIM All-Share Index. AIM is owned by the London Stock Exchange Group.

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