American Accounting Association - AAA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'American Accounting Association - AAA'

An organization that supports worldwide excellence in accounting education, research and practice. The American Accounting Association is the primary professional association for accounting academics in the United States. Formed in 1916 under the name American Association of University Instructors in Accounting, it assumed its current name in 1936. It is a voluntary organization comprised of individuals interested in accounting education and research.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'American Accounting Association - AAA'

The American Accounting Association publishes The Accounting Review - a journal of abstracts, articles and book reviews that promote accounting education, research and practice; Issues in Accounting Education - a publication of research, commentaries, instructional resources and book reviews to assist accounting faculty, and Accounting Horizons - which includes papers focusing on the study of integration and application. Members of the American Accounting Association have access to these publications and additional newsletters and opportunities to participate in regional and/or special interest groups.

RELATED TERMS
  1. The Accounting Review

    An academic publication by the American Accounting Association ...
  2. Financial Statements

    Records that outline the financial activities of a business, ...
  3. Accounting

    The systematic and comprehensive recording of financial transactions ...
  4. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  5. Certified Public Accountant - CPA

    A designation given by the American Institute of Certified Public ...
  6. American National Standards Institute ...

    An organization that oversees the creation and dissemination ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is accounting in the United States different from international accounting?

    Despite major efforts by the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the International Accounting Standards Board, ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the variance/covariance matrix or parametric method in Value at Risk (VaR)?

    The parametric method, also known as the variance-covariance method, is a risk management technique for calculating the value ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are transfer prices set?

    The United States, like most nations, does not want to allow transfer pricing methods that reduce the amount of taxes the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is backtesting in Value at Risk (VaR)?

    The value at risk is a statistical risk management technique that monitors and quantifies the risk level associated with ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do I discount Free Cash Flow to the Firm (FCFF)?

    Discounted free cash flow for the firm (FCFF) should be equal to all of the cash inflows and outflows, adjusted to present ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What's the difference between a confidence level and a confidence interval in Value ...

    The value at risk (VaR) uses both the confidence level and confidence interval. A risk manager uses the VaR to monitor and ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    A Clear Look At EBITDA

    This measure has its benefits, but it can also present earnings through rose-colored glasses.
  2. Professionals

    Finding The Right Accounting Certification

    An accounting certification may be the boost your career needs. Find out how to get the most bang for your buck.
  3. Markets

    Operating Cash Flow: Better Than Net Income?

    Differences between accrual accounting and cash flows show why net income is easier to manipulate.
  4. Retirement

    Navigating Government And Nonprofit Financial Statements

    Learn how to trace where your tax dollars and charitable donations are going.
  5. Professionals

    Financial History: The Evolution Of Accounting

    Follow accounting from its roots in ancient times to the profession we now depend on.
  6. Economics

    Understanding Carrying Value

    Carrying value is the value of an asset as listed on a company’s balance sheet. Carrying value is the same as book value.
  7. Economics

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)

    International Financial Reporting Standards are accounting rules and guidelines governing the reporting of different types of accounting transactions.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Property, Plant and Equipment

    Property, plant and equipment are company assets that are vital to business operations, but not easily liquidated.
  9. Economics

    How to Calculate Trailing 12 Months Income

    Trailing 12 months refers to the most recently completed one-year period of a company’s financial performance.
  10. Economics

    What is Unearned Revenue?

    Unearned revenue can be thought of as a "pre-payment" for goods or services which a person or company is expected to produce to the purchaser.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  2. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  3. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  4. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  5. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
  6. Tangible Net Worth

    A measure of the physical worth of a company, which does not include any value derived from intangible assets such as copyrights, ...
Trading Center