American Accounting Association - AAA

AAA

DEFINITION of 'American Accounting Association - AAA'

An organization that supports worldwide excellence in accounting education, research and practice. The American Accounting Association is the primary professional association for accounting academics in the United States. Formed in 1916 under the name American Association of University Instructors in Accounting, it assumed its current name in 1936. It is a voluntary organization comprised of individuals interested in accounting education and research.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'American Accounting Association - AAA'

The American Accounting Association publishes The Accounting Review - a journal of abstracts, articles and book reviews that promote accounting education, research and practice; Issues in Accounting Education - a publication of research, commentaries, instructional resources and book reviews to assist accounting faculty, and Accounting Horizons - which includes papers focusing on the study of integration and application. Members of the American Accounting Association have access to these publications and additional newsletters and opportunities to participate in regional and/or special interest groups.

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