American Risk and Insurance Association

AAA

DEFINITION of 'American Risk and Insurance Association'

A professional organization for academics and associates in the insurance industry. The American Risk and Insurance Association consists of carriers, scholars and individuals involved in the insurance industry in various capacities. Its purpose is to promote the insurance industry at large to the public and promote further research.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'American Risk and Insurance Association'

The American Risk and Insurance Association is not limited to any particular branch of insurance and promotes the industry as a whole. Its main publication is the Journal of Risk and Insurance. This journal contains news and information on insurance, risk management and related fields of expertise.

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