Amount Realized

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DEFINITION of 'Amount Realized'

The gain or loss resulting from a sale of an asset. The amount realized encompasses all forms of compensation, including cash, the value of any property received as payment and any liabilities that the purchaser assumes as a result of the transaction.

The amount realized does not include transaction costs such as commissions and other related fees.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Amount Realized'

To calculate the amount realized, simply take the difference of the total consideration given and subtract the cost basis. If the difference is positive, then the amount realized is a gain. If the difference is negative, the amount realized is a loss.

The total consideration will also include any liabilities assumed, as in this example:

Assume you have sold some property that has an outstanding mortgage of $75,000 to a buyer. The buyer pays you $40,000 and assumes the mortgage. In this case, you would have realized a total gain of $115,000 ($40,000 payment + $75,000 mortgage transferred).

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