Ancillary Revenue

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DEFINITION of 'Ancillary Revenue'

Revenue generated from goods or services that differ from or enhance the main services or product lines of a company. By introducing new products and services or using existing products to branch into new markets, companies create additional opportunities for growth.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Ancillary Revenue'

Most companies have some form of ancillary revenue. These revenues can vary from car washes at gas stations to advertisements placed on jets. In some cases, what begins as ancillary revenue can become the main source of revenue - for example, when food and beverage sales at gas stations surpassed gasoline revenues.

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