Andrei Shleifer

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DEFINITION of 'Andrei Shleifer'

A Harvard University financial and behavioral economist and winner of the John Bates Clark Medal, given to top economists under age 40. Shleifer is frequently in the top rankings of economics authors according to criteria such as the number of published works, number of citations and number of journal pages.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Andrei Shleifer'

Shleifer was born in Russia in 1961. In 1991 he took an advisory role with the Russian government, helping to lead the country's economic reform after the collapse of the Soviet Union. At the same time, Harvard was employed by the U.S. government to advise the Russian government. Shleifer's involvement with both Harvard and the Russian government culminated in a conflict of interest scandal whereby he had to pay fines and lost his honorary title at Harvard, though he retained his tenure.

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