Annual Budget

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DEFINITION of 'Annual Budget'

Any budget that is prepared for a 12-month period. An annual budget outlines both the income and expenditures that are expected to be received and paid over the coming year. Annual budgets are used by individuals, corporations, governments and various other types of organizations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Annual Budget'

Annual budgets can apply to either a fiscal or calendar year. These budgets help their creators to plan for the upcoming year and make the necessary adjustments in cash flow to cover expenses. Annual budgets help both individuals and organizations to accurately project their future cash flows and effectively manage their money.

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