DEFINITION of 'Annual Renewable Term (ART) Insurance'

A form of term life insurance that offers a guarantee of future insurability for a set period of years, although premiums are paid every year on the basis of a one-year contract. As such, the premiums will rise over time as the insured person ages. This type of insurance is designed for short-term insurance needs.

BREAKING DOWN 'Annual Renewable Term (ART) Insurance'

Annual renewable term insurance is less common than level term insurance, where premiums stay constant over the life of the contract. The longer an insured person uses annual renewable term insurance, the more costly it becomes.

ART insurance typically offers guaranteed re-insurability for a period of 10 to 30 years, depending on the age of the individual.


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