Anti-Diversion Clause

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DEFINITION of 'Anti-Diversion Clause'

A regulation that prevents exported goods from going to destinations not approved by the government. In the United States, the Department of Commerce's Bureau of Export Administration requires commercially exported goods to be accompanied by a destination control statement saying that the goods are only authorized for export to certain locations and that U.S. law prohibits their diversion. The latter part of this statement is the anti-diversion clause.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Anti-Diversion Clause'

The destination control statement and anti-diversion clause must appear on the invoice and ocean bill of lading or air waybill that accompanies the exported goods. The statement also certifies that to the best of the shipper's knowledge, the shipment is headed to its stated destination. National security, nonproliferation and foreign policy are some of the reasons why a country's government may be concerned with controlling its exports. In the United States, most exports of items on the Commerce Control List must contain a destination control statement.

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