Anti-Dumping Duty

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Anti-Dumping Duty'

A protectionist tariff that a domestic government imposes on foreign imports that it believes are priced below fair market value. In the United States, anti-dumping duties are imposed by the Department of Commerce and often exceed 100%. They come into play when a foreign company is selling an item significantly below the price at which it is being produced. The logic behind anti-dumping duties is to save domestic jobs, although critics argue that this leads to higher prices for domestic consumers and reduces the competitiveness of domestic companies producing similar goods.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Anti-Dumping Duty'

Some people believe that a foreign company will even lower the price of the product it is "dumping" below its own cost to manufacture the good in order to drive domestic competitors out of business and later raise prices. Even when a foreign company sells its exports at the same or a higher price than they sell for in the company's home country, the importing country can decide that the exporter is guilty of "dumping" and impose an anti-dumping duty.

Anti-dumping duties are believed to distort the market because the government cannot determine what constitutes a fair market price for any good or service. This is because fair market value is whatever price the market will bear as determined by supply and demand.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Free Trade Area

    A group of countries that invoke little or no price control in ...
  2. Tariff

    A tax imposed on imported goods and services. Tariffs are used ...
  3. Customs Barrier

    Any measure designed to limit international trade. A customs ...
  4. Trade War

    A negative side effect of protectionism that occurs when Country ...
  5. Dumping

    In international trade, the export by a country or company of ...
  6. Quota

    A government-imposed trade restriction that limits the number, ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  2. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  3. Economics

    The Basics Of Tariffs And Trade Barriers

    Everything you need to know - from the different types of tariffs to their effects on the local economy.
  4. Economics

    Do Cheap Imported Goods Cost Americans Jobs?

    Flooding the market with cheap products can mean job losses and even market collapse - but dumping isn't as threatening as it seems.
  5. Economics

    What Is The World Trade Organization?

    The WTO sets the global rules of trade. But what exactly does it do and why do so many oppose it?
  6. Economics

    NAFTA's Winners And Losers

    Read on to find out who this free-trade agreement helped, and who it hurt.
  7. Economics

    What is the Income Effect?

    In economics, the income effect is the change in the consumption of goods caused by a change in income, whether income goes up or down.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a Null Hypothesis?

    In statistics, a null hypothesis is assumed true until proven otherwise.
  9. Economics

    Asian LNG Prices: Not Likely To Rise Anytime Soon

    Asian LNG prices could stay low for an extended period of time, due to low oil prices, less demand and new LNG-producing projects on various continents.
  10. Economics

    Bulk Shipping Companies Struggle As Markets Soften

    The "soft" dry bulk shipping market that confronts shipping companies is a result of lower demand from China, and an excessive amount of bulk ships.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
  2. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value is also commonly used to refer to the market capitalization ...
  3. Preference Shares

    Company stock with dividends that are paid to shareholders before common stock dividends are paid out. In the event of a ...
  4. Accrued Interest

    1. A term used to describe an accrual accounting method when interest that is either payable or receivable has been recognized, ...
  5. Absorption Costing

    A managerial accounting cost method of expensing all costs associated with manufacturing a particular product. Absorption ...
  6. Currency Carry Trade

    A strategy in which an investor sells a certain currency with a relatively low interest rate and uses the funds to purchase ...
Trading Center