Anti-Takeover Measure


DEFINITION of 'Anti-Takeover Measure'

Measures taken on a continual or sporadic basis by a firm's management in order to prevent or deter unwanted takeovers.

BREAKING DOWN 'Anti-Takeover Measure'

Companies have many different options for preventing takeovers. Continuous provisions include stipulations in the corporate covenant and issues of participating preferred stock. The sporadic measures include the pac-man and macaroni defenses, among others.

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