Anti-Takeover Statute


DEFINITION of 'Anti-Takeover Statute'

A set of state regulations that prevent or deter companies from attempting hostile takeovers. These regulations vary across state lines and typically affect only the companies incorporated within the state

BREAKING DOWN 'Anti-Takeover Statute'

Although these statutes are meant to restrict predatory takeovers, they will sometimes be detrimental to shareholders by preventing companies from partaking in profitable or justified takeovers.

  1. Acquisition

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    A corporate action where an acquiring company makes a bid for ...
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  5. Macaroni Defense

    An approach taken by a company that does not want to be taken ...
  6. Hostile Takeover

    The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by ...
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