Anti-Takeover Statute

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DEFINITION of 'Anti-Takeover Statute'

A set of state regulations that prevent or deter companies from attempting hostile takeovers. These regulations vary across state lines and typically affect only the companies incorporated within the state

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Anti-Takeover Statute'

Although these statutes are meant to restrict predatory takeovers, they will sometimes be detrimental to shareholders by preventing companies from partaking in profitable or justified takeovers.

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